THE VALUED VOICE

Vol. 64, Issue 36
Click here to view past issues
Thursday, September 3, 2020

   

Fast Facts from the WHA Information Center: September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2020, there will be 1,806,950 new cancer cases and more than 600,000 cancer related deaths. These staggering numbers indicate just how prevalent cancer is in the United States. For women, ovarian cancer is one of the most commonly found forms of cancer. The American Cancer Society states that during the lifetime of a woman, her risk of being diagnosed with ovarian cancer is about 1 in 78.
 
WHA Information Center analyzed data collected from Wisconsin hospitals to see how residents are affected by ovarian cancer. The data, which combined both inpatient (INP) and outpatient (OPS) services, showed that the average age for women diagnosed is 62 years old. The majority of the cases fell in the 60- to 70-year-old bin. When looking at race and ethnicity, 94% of patients were white and 96% did not have a Hispanic or Latino origin.
 
The average total charge per patient visit was found to be $38,939, combining inpatient and outpatient visits. The total charge per year increased from 2017 to 2018, yet decreased when going from 2018 to 2019. The overall trend from 2017-2019 shows a decrease in outpatient and inpatient visits related to ovarian cancer.
 
There are key signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer. Note: early stage ovarian cancer may not present many symptoms; patients may notice symptoms if the cancer has spread. Symptoms vary for each woman:
 
  • Bloating
  • Pelvic or abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Trouble eating or feeling full quickly
  • Urinary symptoms (i.e. always feeling like you have to go or going often)
  • Weight loss
Signs and symptoms facts come from the American Cancer Society and Mayo Clinic.
 

This story originally appeared in the September 03, 2020 edition of WHA Newsletter

WHA Logo
Thursday, September 3, 2020

Fast Facts from the WHA Information Center: September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2020, there will be 1,806,950 new cancer cases and more than 600,000 cancer related deaths. These staggering numbers indicate just how prevalent cancer is in the United States. For women, ovarian cancer is one of the most commonly found forms of cancer. The American Cancer Society states that during the lifetime of a woman, her risk of being diagnosed with ovarian cancer is about 1 in 78.
 
WHA Information Center analyzed data collected from Wisconsin hospitals to see how residents are affected by ovarian cancer. The data, which combined both inpatient (INP) and outpatient (OPS) services, showed that the average age for women diagnosed is 62 years old. The majority of the cases fell in the 60- to 70-year-old bin. When looking at race and ethnicity, 94% of patients were white and 96% did not have a Hispanic or Latino origin.
 
The average total charge per patient visit was found to be $38,939, combining inpatient and outpatient visits. The total charge per year increased from 2017 to 2018, yet decreased when going from 2018 to 2019. The overall trend from 2017-2019 shows a decrease in outpatient and inpatient visits related to ovarian cancer.
 
There are key signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer. Note: early stage ovarian cancer may not present many symptoms; patients may notice symptoms if the cancer has spread. Symptoms vary for each woman:
 
  • Bloating
  • Pelvic or abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Trouble eating or feeling full quickly
  • Urinary symptoms (i.e. always feeling like you have to go or going often)
  • Weight loss
Signs and symptoms facts come from the American Cancer Society and Mayo Clinic.
 

This story originally appeared in the September 03, 2020 edition of WHA Newsletter